A Good Creative Brief Template

The first step towards good creative output is a good creative brief.

For those of you that just want to take a look at the doc, click on the button below or visit richh.co/brief.

 

DOWNLOAD THE BRIEF TEMPLATE (RICHH.CO/brief)

 

The fact that a good brief is important may seem obvious, but it’s something that’s all too often overlooked, and a trap I fell into a few too many times early in my career.

It’s all to easy to get carried away and jump head-long into a big (or small) project after a few phone calls or emails, make a bunch of assumptions, and deliver a piece of work that, at the end, has such glaringly big holes in it that you wonder why you didn’t ask some obvious and important questions up front.

That’s where a good creative brief template comes in. It won’t provide you with all the information you need to finish up with a great project, but it will make sure you’re heading in the right direction from the start by covering the main things you’ll need to take into account.

 

A good brief should cover (as succinctly as possible)

  • Objective – what’s the point of this video?
  • Target audience
  • Key points you want to get across / Project specifics
  • Due date
  • Budget
  • Required output
  • Video usage
  • Does the video require a voice over?
  • Does the video require music?
  • Existing video references
  • Required style
  • Tone/Feeling
  • What assets (if any) can be provided?

 

The Google Doc I’ve linked to above is geared towards videos and animations and is good to go in 90% of cases as it is; but sometimes I tweak it so it’s more project specific (to ask more leading questions) if I already know a little about the upcoming job.

If you need to fit it to your own projects, ones that aren’t animated, just switch the word video for project and you’re away!

 

If you’ve got any suggestions, advice or changes you’d make to the doc, please let me know!

 

 

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